Farmer Focus: Freshman Naomi Ntuli

'I also feel like I’m in one big family because of all the people I meet through [orchestra]. It’s really nice to know you always have a community of people around you.'

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Jannelle Everett

"I picked cello because it was a really pretty instrument, soundwise. I originally picked clarinet for band, but they needed a bassoon and my elementary recommended me so that’s how I ended up playing bassoon."

This month’s Farmer Focus is on freshman Naomi Ntuli who is in concert band and honors orchestra.

SNAPSHOTS

Dogs or cats: Cats

Favorite snack: Gummy worms

Favorite show: “13 Reasons Why”

Vanilla, chocolate or strawberry: Vanilla

Favorite sport: Volleyball

ZOOMING IN

Q: What made you pick your instruments? When did you start playing each one?

A: “I started playing each of my instruments in sixth grade. I picked cello because it was a really pretty instrument, soundwise. I originally picked clarinet for band, but they needed a bassoon and my elementary recommended me so that’s how I ended up playing bassoon.”

Q: How do school and volleyball conflict with your instruments?

A: “They don’t actually. I feel like if I was actually in marching band it would, but since I’m only in concert they [aren’t conflicting] for me. I feel like that could differ from someone who was in marching band, orchestra and volleyball.”

Q: What’s the best part about playing your instruments?

A: “Trying to find the balance between things even though it’s very hard. I’ve worked on [balancing things] and I feel like I’ve gotten better at it over the years.”

Q: Which instrument between bassoon and cello do you prefer to play and why?

A: “Cello because I feel like it comes more naturally to me. It’s also able to produce a rich and warm sound which helps calm me. Hearing how each note resonates in a room is one of the coolest things you’ll hear.”

Q: What’s your favorite type of music to play?

A: “Classical and slow because I’m good at projecting emotion and using musicality, just by dynamics and vibrato, whether or not you’re playing loud or you’re going to be softer.”

Q: What inspires you to keep playing music?

A: “The fact that I’m able to get lost in it and that it’s somewhat of an escape. I also feel like I’m in one big family because of all the people I meet through it. It’s really nice to know you always have a community of people around you.”

Q: How do the directors treat you in middle school and high school? How is it different from each other?

A: “I feel like now they treat you more advanced because of the setting. They go more fast-paced and they expect more of you since you’re in the top group.”

Q: What similarities and differences do the two instruments have from each other? Does that make it easier or harder to learn both?

A: “They’re both on the same clef which is really helpful so I don’t have to learn different things, but it’s mainly the fingerings. It’s not that hard to differentiate.”

Q: What lifelong skills have you learned from band and orchestra?

A: “I learned how to multitask and organize my stuff, like my life and how to balance volleyball, orchestra [and] band. The planner they gave us really helps with my organization and I feel like my organization skills have gotten better throughout my freshman year.”

Q: What’s the biggest difficulty of having so many extracurricular activities?

A: “Stress because I’m not really good at handling it well. Knowing whether or not you’re supposed to be at a specific place at a certain time. Making sure you’re there [and] participating. Sleep [too], I don’t get any of that.”

Q: Do you plan to play your instruments after graduating highschool? After college?

A: “Probably not, I just don’t see myself playing after [high school or college]. It might change in the future, but for now, I don’t plan to.”