Farmer Focus: Senior Ketia Ifulu

‘[I] bring awareness to any issues but try to make a positive impact. The little things I do is say hello to everybody and make sure those kids that are not as heard feel heard.’

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Daniel Angeletti

“[I encourage] people to be proud of where they come from. I feel like it’s really a challenge to express yourself through all that’s been going on.”

SNAPSHOTS

Current college plans: Prairie View A&M for psychology 

Favorite food: Potatoes

Dogs or cats: Dogs

Favorite TV show: Greenleaf on Netflix

Favorite hobby: Dancing 

ZOOMING IN

Q: What is a multicultural officer in Student Council and what do you like about the position?

A: “We as multicultural officers recognize cultures and it’s a way to celebrate where students come from. We basically promote different cultures.”

Q: What difference do you make in the community or in the school?

A: “[I] bring awareness to any issues but try to make a positive impact. The little things I do is say hello to everybody and make sure those kids that are not as heard feel heard.” 

Q:  What is one thing you are working on now as a multicultural officer?

A:  “[I am] finalizing Hispanic Heritage Month. Getting started in October and finding new projects. [We also want] to show appreciation to our Hispanic custodians and faculty. On the last day, students [can] come in their baile wear and pass out Mexican candy. Every day on the announcements I have some facts about Hispanic Heritage Month recognizing influential Hispanic people.”

Q: How much time out of your week does being a Farmerette take? How does it impact your life in school and at home?

A: “It takes nine hours out of my week. In a way, it impacts my life outside of school because when I get home my mom has already cooked dinner and I have to make things for myself.”

Q: What are the biggest life lessons you have learned from being in these school organizations? 

A: “One thing it has taught me is to be an independent woman because I know what I want now. I’m very structured in life. I know where I want to go and what I want to do.”

Q: What is your biggest struggle in these activities?

A: “Having time for my friends and family. Really making time outside of school time for my family and my social life, but it does hurt not having time for my family.”

Q:  What will you remember most about being a Farmerette after you graduate?

A: “Just being with my officers on Farmerettes, bonding and creating new relationships. Also, connecting with other females on Farmerettes.”

Q: How would you describe how you made an impact in school as a multicultural officer?

A: “I feel like I made an impact because I recognize where everyone comes from. Also, [I encourage] people to be proud of where they come from. I feel like it’s really a challenge to express yourself through all that’s been going on.”

Q: What type of community service have you participated in and which one has been your favorite and why?

A: “I do a lot of community clean-ups. I have also participated on boards with the mayor to try to make the community better. I think that one was my favorite because I feel like the mayor sat down and heard us out.”

Q: What is your favorite part of being a Farmerette 

A: “To me, it’s dancing and being [myself]. Just dancing and performing because it’s a space for me to express myself. I love when we go to competitions and showcase our hardest work.”

Q: When did you develop a passion for dancing and how?

A: “I think I developed a passion for dancing my sophomore year. I think it started for me because I had a lot of issues going on at home. I would come to school and dance and I would be so overwhelmed, this is where I need to be and this is what I need to do.”

Q: What do you look forward to most as a Farmerette?

A: “I look forward to the spring show which is our last show of the year. I know spring shows are going to tear me down but in a good way. It’s a good way of growth.”