HOSA students prepare for future careers

District competition took place Dec. 3-5

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HOSA students prepare for future careers

Senior Kathryn Foster studies for the HOSA state test.

Senior Kathryn Foster studies for the HOSA state test.

Valerie Benzinger

Senior Kathryn Foster studies for the HOSA state test.

Valerie Benzinger

Valerie Benzinger

Senior Kathryn Foster studies for the HOSA state test.

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HOSA future health professionals is a national club based in Southlake, Texas which helps prepare students for careers in the medical field. Students recently had their first round of district testing from Tuesday, Dec. 3 through Thursday, Dec. 5.

The 100-question test has a variety of questions testing their knowledge in the medical field on topics ranging from medical terminology to pathophysiology. To prepare for the competitions, students have to study independently through textbooks or quizlets. HOSA sponsor Kelly Lancaster helps students by supplying them with books to study from.

“I try to provide as many resources as I can to [my students],” Lancaster said. “I spend a lot of time looking for textbooks online or study guides. I actually have a database of study material on Google Drive. I share the folder of what they’re studying with them.”

The club helps students plan for the future by having guest speakers talk to them about jobs in the medical field. Being able to learn from people with actual experience in the medical careers they’re interested in, the students are able to obtain a better understanding of the medical field.

“I really enjoy listening to our guest speakers in HOSA,” senior Katie Chappell said. “They’re really great [and] they give us a lot of insight into the medical field.”

HOSA is also helping students prepare for college in various ways, such as learning how to study effectively. With the experience the students gain from being in the club, they have a higher chance of being accepted into medical schools.

“I’ve gotten much better at studying and really honing in on what I need to know and what I can exclude,” senior Kathryn Foster said. “[I have been] referencing quizlets, compiling a whole bunch of notecards and quizzing myself daily.”

After this round of testing, students found out whether or not they advance to further into the competition. One student will advance to state and six others to area which will take place in Crowley, Texas at the end of January.

“We had one student, Kathryn Foster, qualify for state at Galveston and six students that qualified to go to area,” Lancaster said. “The [students] that went to area can still go to state if they do well enough at area.”